Advanced Pediatric Therapies

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What Can you do to help your child to thrive?

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Have you ever heard the term “Emotional Intelligence”?  It was a buzzword back in the ’90’s when the book by Daniel Goleman came out.  It continues forward into today on the website/movement Six Seconds.  As a global movement, it focuses on helping people to know themselves, exercise self awareness and self management and build others up in the process.  It is a natural tool for both teaching and parenting.

In a recent post on the website, Six Seconds describes what kids need to be able to thrive, and how you can support them in doing just that.

It basically breaks down three skills that kids need to flourish. The first is “engaging intrinsic motivation.”  In other words, doing something because they want to, not necessarily because you want them to! It’s inner motivation.  The second is “exercising optimism.”  This means the child has a sense of hope for the future.  And the third is “pursuing noble goals.”  This means they experience that it feels good to be part of a larger purpose.

Sounds like a tall order, eh?  Yes, but to help kids get there (and you, for that matter), they suggest a few simple steps for you to be aware of in your daily life with your little ones, on up to your teens.

1. Give kids the space and power to choose what they want.  Okay, within reason.  It means let them try that gymnastics class even if you think they are not coordinated enough.  It means letting them have more control in their lives at home and at school.  This is a building block of well being for all of us:  being able to choose what we think will work for us.

2. Model what it’s like to focus on these well being skills yourself.  What does that look like?  Try new things, follow your passions, get excited about doing something.  Let them see this in you.  For example, you don’t have to yell at the guy who cuts you off in traffic.  And if you do, you can point out that you maybe didn’t have to let that get you upset.  Find ways to take care of yourself.  Remember, they are ALWAYS WATCHING.

3.  Encourage your kids to have down time.  The lives of many kids, even preschoolers, can be very overscheduled.  Reexamine your family time and see if maybe just one activity at a time could be doable.  Model taking your own downtime.  Resist the pressure that can come from others.  Know what works for your family.

Finally, it should be noted that well being begins a downward trend from ages 7-18.  Practitioners of emotional intelligence want you to know that you can help your child develop these skills.  Their research and data appear on their website sixseconds.org.

 

 

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