Advanced Pediatric Therapies

Kid-Powered

Is Your Child Getting Enough Exercise?

on January 28, 2018

happy kids , jumping

A recent article in the Journal Pediatrics uncovered a growing problem among preschoolers that has already affected elementary and high school age kids.  Researchers studied the amount of active play that preschoolers engaged in during a typical day at a child care programs in Seattle.  The kids averaged 48 minutes per day, despite ongoing recommendations that kids engage in 2 hours per day of activity.  Pooja Tandon, a professor at the University of Washington and a researcher at Seattle Children’s Hospital cites the worrisome statistics.  Childhood obesity has increased to 18% in kids aged 6 to 11 from 7% in 1980.  Preschoolers have been studied less, but habits developed at this age are likely to follow them to elementary school and beyond.  Day care providers who are more in line with the 2 hour recommendations for active play report improved behavior and even improved sleep at nap time.

What can you do?  Talk to your day care center about how much physical activity is part of their daily schedule.  This includes outdoor time even if it’s raining!

For elementary aged kids, the statistics are daunting.

  • 74% of families say that “family time” is spent in front of a television set
  • 52% of parents say technology is getting in the way of physical activity.
  • 58% of parents say their kids get outside less than 3 days a week.
  • 38% of parents say there is not enough time in the day to achieve physical activity standards.
  • 38% of parents say they can’t afford extracurricular activities to improve physical fitness
  • 41% of families get less than 60 minutes of exercise one day per week.
  • 50% of kids are spending a minimum of 3 hours a day in front of a screen.

With so many kids adopting such low expectations regarding physical activity, their chances for developing chronic diseases like diabetes are increasing.

Consider the following:

  • Most parks and recreation programs have scholarships set up for families who can’t afford extracurricular activities.
  • Kids do what they see:  make sure you have an activity program in place, even if it’s just walking the dog after dinner.
  • Play games that are physical like charades, Twister or Wii.
  • Go outside.  Even if it’s raining.  Kids love puddles!
  • Consider using incentives and think outside the box.  Redefine what it means to “play.”

If you need help setting up an activity program with your child, please ask.  We can help figure out ways to work it into your routine.

Best,

Jeanne

 

 

 

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